Agroturismo Cosmopolita is managed by Eglantina, anthropologist.
80 - 235/night
Suitable for 2-5 people

Loading contact form...
Bedroom - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal
— Eglantina: “Guests can feel a sense of the world passing here, through the historical architecture and the traditional way of living. We are like an anti-resort.”
Interview By:

— Please tell us a bit about the history of your agroturismo in the Algarve.

Eglantina: “Until the ‘60s, it was a very busy farm with a lot of people working there. Agriculture was very important in this region. There were several farms in the area, even one which was close to the sea and with a boat to bring the fish. There was a regular fair at this farm to exchange goods, so it was a really important economic center, in a way creating an almost self-sufficient environment.

Today our property is still a working organic farm producing carob, olives, almonds, oranges and figs, which are used mainly for the boutique hotel. The main production, though is apricots. We grow around 10.000 to 20.000 kilos of apricots every year that we export to Northern Europe.”
Bedroom - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal
— Bedroom

— How long did it take you to refurbish the property and when did you open the agroturism hotel?

Eglantina: “We opened for agroturism in 2008. But for seven years before that we were busy refurbishing the ruins that were on the farm. I was kind of a curator planning how things would look and we, together with the architect Pedro Ressano Garcia, wanted to take our time to learn how the ecosystem worked with the weather. For example, we don’t have air conditioning, we have fans. Every room has a door and a window for better air circulation.”
Communal areas - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal
— Communal areas

— Please tell us a bit about the architecture of the hotel.

Eglantina: “All the buildings on the property were done at different times. It started at the beginning of the 19th century and due to family needs or industrial advances, other buildings started appearing. They would put in another door or window here or there. Our renovations were a lot like that. The new additions are mainly about function. But the old walls remain and you can get a sense of the history.

What‘s interesting is that you can see the different ‘layers’ in the building process, how it has changed throughout the years. Our renovations have become part of the history of the property.

The materials we used were all gathered from the land, we call it ‘taipa’ or rammed earth. It is a technique for building using the raw materials of earth, chalk, lime and gravel. But we also used modern techniques for the roof to improve the isolation for example.”
 - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal

— How would you describe the style of the interior of the hotel?

Eglantina: “It’s like contemporary meets historical. All the floors and bathrooms are done in concrete. There is also glass, wood, and cork from the area, as well as a lot of recycled materials. We tried to re-functionalize the materials to meet our needs.

It’s like ‘arte povera’ — the contemporary art of the ‘60s & ‘70s — the idea of reutilization of things for a simpler look with raw materials. I also found old furniture and mixed a lot of different styles. Some of the pieces were from the house originally, but I also added contemporary pieces.”
Hotel interior - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal
— Hotel interior

— Tell us a bit about the hotel rooms and the other facilities.

Eglantina: “We rent nine bedrooms and four apartments at this time. We have two living areas — one used to be an olive oil press room. We also have a contemporary library that has books on subjects such as the ecosystem and food, art literature, the landscape, architecture and so on.

Another thing important to us is the food, especially the breakfasts we serve. We don’t buy anything from the supermarket. We only use good, local products that are in season. It’s a way to experience a place by tasting it. And this is also important for our region as we are helping local products to get known by the people coming here. For example, we have some former guests who are now selling ‘muxama’ — which is dried tuna — in their country. So people in other places in Europe learn about the products from our region.”
Hotel interior - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal
— Hotel interior

— How would you describe your agroturismo in a nutshell?

Eglantina: “Guests can feel a sense of the world passing here, through the historical architecture and the traditional way of living. We are like an anti-resort.”
 - Agroturismo Cosmopolita, in Algarve, Portugal
 
Copyright © 2016 Welcome Beyond